Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Pole Walking: Walking with Attitude, Walking YOUNG

As we age, we can lose or reduce spine function.   Using poles for walking and hiking enables us to use our upper body muscles to help preserve our joints.   Spine function can be restored. This is done because, when we walk with poles, we appear to walk as we did when younger – with attitude.   We are using muscles which support AND lengthen the spine.   Walking with attitude – with purpose – is the natural walking pattern.   It’s called reciprocal gait. It’s the diagonal pattern of opposite arm and leg.   When this occurs, the spine is able to ROTATE. This spinal rotation feels good, looks good and is very healthy.

Walking with poles recruits core muscles, including the latissimus dorsi, lower trapezius and oblique muscles.   These core muscles, when used, strengthen.   When optimal posture and form are used, the spine lengthens.    Gravity acts,  the spine compresses, we get shorter.   Using poles actually can reverse this process – the spine lengthens and elongates.

All of this assumes a natural arm swing. The arm swing is part of the spinal rotation and muscle recruitment. Learning optimal use of poles is key to achieving these benefits.   Beware fads or techniques that involve elbow pumping.   Repetitive movement of a joint can cause stress.   Repetitive movement especially of an elbow joint can cause tendonitis.   Anything that does not look natural or like walking “with attitude” needs to be approached with caution.

  • As you walk, think of walking with purpose or focus.
  • Think of a lovely sachet or of strutting.
  • One lady said, “Oh you want me to walk Sassy!.”  YES!
  • Whatever works for you, know that you cannot rotate too much.
  • It only looks like you’re walking YOUNG.

Regain the vibrancy of youthful walking – learn to walk optimally with poles and Enjoy the Outdoors!

 

 

As we age, we can lose or reduce spine function.  Using poles for walking and hiking enables us to use our upper body muscles to help preserve our joints.  Spine function can be restored.  This is done because, when we walk with poles, we appear to walk as we did when younger – with attitude. We are using muscles which support AND lengthen the spine.  Walking with attitude – with purpose –  is the natural walking pattern.  It’s called reciprocal gait.  It’s the diagonal pattern of opposite arm and leg.  When this occurs, the spine is able to ROTATE.  This spinal rotation feels good, looks good and is very healthy.

Walking with poles recruits the latissimus dorsi and oblique muscles.  These core muscles, when used, strengthen.  When optimal posture and form are used, the spine lengthens.  Gravity causes people to get shorter – the spine compresses.  Using poles actually can reverse this process – the spine lengthens.

All of this assumes a natural arm swing.  The arm swing is part of the spinal rotation and muscle recruitment.   Learning optimal use is critical to achieve these benefits.  Beware fads or techniques that involve elbow pumping.  Repetitive movement of a joint can cause stress.   Repetitive movement especially of an elbow joint can cause tendonitis.  Anything that does not look natural or like walking “with attitude” needs to be approached with caution.

As we age, we can lose or reduce spine function. Using poles for walking and hiking enables us to use our upper body muscles to help preserve our joints. Spine function can be restored. This is done because, when we walk with poles, we appear to walk as we did when younger – with attitude. We are using muscles which support AND lengthen the spine. Walking with attitude – with purpose – is the natural walking pattern. It’s called reciprocal gait. It’s the diagonal pattern of opposite arm and leg. When this occurs, the spine is able to ROTATE. This spinal rotation feels good, looks good and is very healthy.

 

 

 

Walking with poles recruits the latissimus dorsi and oblique muscles. These core muscles, when used, strengthen. When optimal posture and form are used, the spine lengthens. Gravity causes people to get shorter – the spine compresses. Using poles actually can reverse this process – the spine lengthens.

 

 

 

All of this assumes a natural arm swing. The arm swing is part of the spinal rotation and muscle recruitment. Learning optimal use is critical to achieve these benefits. Beware fads or techniques that involve elbow pumping. Repetitive movement of a joint can cause stress. Repetitive movement especially of an elbow joint can cause tendonitis. Anything that does not look natural or like walking “with attitude” needs to be approached with caution.

 

 

Comments

2 Responses to “Pole Walking: Walking with Attitude, Walking YOUNG”
  1. Stephanie-Noel Dodt says:

    I am 62 and became fascinated by Nordic Walking while finishing
    surgery, chemo and radiation for breast cancer. I love it and have become
    fascinated by “all things poles” because I have osteoarthritis which
    was worsened by “Red Devil” and Taxol chemo. I finished my last radiation treatment was 3/8/13 and I was at work early making my first Nordic Walk of 4/10 of a mile around our
    parking lot Monday 3/11! I stuck with it very devotedly, working up to
    walking 2 miles before work and 2 miles at lunchtime every day. It has paid
    off handsomely. Yesterday I did my 2 mile lunchtime walk with speed of 3.5 mph.
    Today I was determined to walk 10K for the first time and I succeeded in
    walking 6.77 miles with an average speed of 2.9 mph. One night I Googled
    “Nordic Walking Breast Cancer” and found your website, as a fellow BC
    survivor. I have both of your DVDs and love them. I was just watching your
    Mobility DVD and enjoying it thoroughly!

    Nordic walking gave me my life back. I am contemplating activities that had
    faded from view before breast cancer. Who says your “new normal” can’t be
    BETTER?

    Thank you for two beautiful websites and DVDs!

    P.S. I was interested in how to exercise safely after treatment and had read two journal articles that advised wearing compression garments. My radiation oncologist set me up with a wonderful physical therapist who fitted me with compression sleeves to protect my left arm during exercise. I DO wear them even though I do not have lymphedema.

    • Wear sleeve when you fly in an airplane – this is critical!
      Know the contra-indications to prevent lymphedema.

      Water exercise is the best if you can – especially as you start up again. The pressure of the water stimulates your lymphatic system.
      Any of the balance exercises on the mobility DVD are good to work on.

      Do less than you think you can – consistency vs. intensity!
      Keep me posted?

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